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  1. #BehindTheSeams with Thom Browne

  2. newyorker:

“The story of Oculus VR … has the shape of a contemporary fairy tale.” Simon Parkin on Facebook’s acquisition of the virtual-reality company: http://nyr.kr/1pzVEJV
Above: Palmer Luckey. Photograph courtesy of Oculus Rift.
newyorker:

“The story of Oculus VR … has the shape of a contemporary fairy tale.” Simon Parkin on Facebook’s acquisition of the virtual-reality company: http://nyr.kr/1pzVEJV
Above: Palmer Luckey. Photograph courtesy of Oculus Rift.
    High Resolution

    newyorker:

    “The story of Oculus VR … has the shape of a contemporary fairy tale.” Simon Parkin on Facebook’s acquisition of the virtual-reality company: http://nyr.kr/1pzVEJV

    Above: Palmer Luckey. Photograph courtesy of Oculus Rift.

    (Source: newyorker.com)

  3. Apple's Forthcoming "Healthbook" Software

    parislemon:

    An insanely detailed leak of Apple’s forthcoming Healthbook software (likely a part of iOS 8) by Mark Gurman:

    Each category of functionality is a card in the Healthbook. Cards are distinguished by a color, and the tabs can be arranged to fit user preferences. As can be seen in the above images, Healthbook has sections that can track data pertaining to bloodwork, heart rate, hydration, blood pressure, physical activity, nutrition, blood sugar, sleep, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, and weight.

    The big question, as Gurman notes at the end, is which devices will supply the data to Healthbook? Certainly, the iPhone itself is one (especially the models with an M7 chip). And it sure sounds like some sort of forthcoming “iWatch" would be another. But given the scope of Healthbook, it also seems likely to me that Apple will allow third-party devices to work with the software. This being Apple, you can be sure such a list will be curated, at least at first.

    To that end, just remember that Tim Cook remains on Nike’s Board of Directors…

  4. Why I’m interested in Bitcoin - Chris Dixon

  5. Cathy Horyn, New York Times Fashion Critic, Has Resigned [Updated]

  6. I try my best to update frequently but lately everything has been a blur.

  7. Apple's $3 Trillion Valuation

    parislemon:

    Jay Haynes takes me to task on a point I made recently:

    MG Siegler noted that Apple “wants to be the ones to disrupt themselves… But never with stakes this high…”. But I would argue the stakes were incredibly high when Apple decided to disrupt the Mac and the iPod (both about 100% of their revenue) at the same time. And history is a good indication that Apple is probably thinking about disrupting the iPhone, even now. A truly disruptive product to the iPhone might not emerge for years, but I can’t think of another company that would prepare for and execute a self-disruption strategy like Apple. It is in their culture to do it, as long as the new product is insanely great. As a result, Apple deserves a higher future growth rate than the market is currently giving it.

    Sure, I guess what I meant was that the stakes have never been this high in terms of the revenue. Of course Apple wants to be the one to disrupt the iPhone and they’re thinking about it — I’m just not convinced it’s possible to replace such a high level or revenue. And that’s not a knock on Apple, I’m not sure anyone can. The iPhone is just that good of a business.

    Another point Haynes makes that I absolutely agree with:

    Microsoft made the mistake of targeting the “iPod market” with the Zune. But JTBD theory shows us that there is no such thing as an iPod market, just as there isn’t a cassette market, an LP market, or a CD market. Companies get disrupted because they define the market based on their product, not on the customers job-to-be-done, e.g. the markets for listening to music and discovering new music.

    That’s exactly the right way to think about it. It’s the end, not the means.

  8. "I actually attack the concept of happiness. The idea that - I don’t mind people being happy - but the idea that everything we do is part of the pursuit of happiness seems to me a really dangerous idea and has led to a contemporary disease in Western society, which is fear of sadness. It’s a really odd thing that we’re now seeing people saying “write down 3 things that made you happy today before you go to sleep”, and “cheer up” and “happiness is our birthright” and so on. We’re kind of teaching our kids that happiness is the default position - it’s rubbish. Wholeness is what we ought to be striving for and part of that is sadness, disappointment, frustration, failure; all of those things which make us who we are. Happiness and victory and fulfillment are nice little things that also happen to us, but they don’t teach us much. Everyone says we grow through pain and then as soon as they experience pain they say “Quick! Move on! Cheer up!” I’d like just for a year to have a moratorium on the word “happiness” and to replace it with the word “wholeness”. Ask yourself “is this contributing to my wholeness?” and if you’re having a bad day, it is."

     - Hugh Mackay (via ehosk)

    (Source: psych-facts, via ehosk)

  9. "A journalist for a literary magazine interviewed Jean Cocteau, whose house was filled with several books, paintings, and drawings by famous artists. Cocteau had a deep affection for each and every object and thus kept everything he cherished. Seeing this, the journalist asked Cocteau: ‘If this house were to catch fire right now and you could only rescue one thing, what would you choose?’ Cocteau responded “I would take the fire.”"

     - Jean Cocteau  (via bodyfluids)

    (Source: lifeinpoetry, via bodyfluids)

  10. hellfirerising:

London designer creates 3D-printed, regenerative running shoes from protocells




At the Wearable Futures conference, London designer and researcher Shamees Aden debuted a running shoe concept that will put your worn out kicks to shame. The shoes, which he’s developing with University of Southern Denmark professor Martin Hanczyc, are 3D printed from a synthetic biological material that can repair itself overnight.
The running shoes are the product of Aden’s study of protocells. The basic protocell molecules are not themselves alive, but can be combined to create living organisms. Mixing different protocells creates different properties, and allows them to be programmed to behave differently depending on heat, light, and pressure. The shoes’ unique construction allows them to be 3D printed to the exact size of the user’s foot, so they would fit like a second skin. While running, the shoes would react to pressure and movement, providing extra cushioning when needed.
"The cells have the capability to inflate and deflate and to respond to pressure," Aden tells Dezeen. “As you’re running on different grounds and textures it’s able to inflate or deflate depending on the pressure you put onto it and could help support you as a runner.”
After the run, the shoes would be placed in a jar filled with living liquid protocell. The liquid works almost as a recharger or a reviver, keeping the living organisms in the shoes healthy and helping them rejuvenate. The liquid can also be dyed any color, so the shoes would take on the hue of its liquid protocell charger.
It’s an interesting concept that not only blurs the line between living and non-living organisms, but also pushes the boundaries of 3D printing. According to Aden, the technology is nearly here, and these shoes could become a reality by 2050.

    hellfirerising:

    London designer creates 3D-printed, regenerative running shoes from protocells

    Shamees Aden protocell running shoe

    At the Wearable Futures conference, London designer and researcher Shamees Aden debuted a running shoe concept that will put your worn out kicks to shame. The shoes, which he’s developing with University of Southern Denmark professor Martin Hanczyc, are 3D printed from a synthetic biological material that can repair itself overnight.

    The running shoes are the product of Aden’s study of protocells. The basic protocell molecules are not themselves alive, but can be combined to create living organisms. Mixing different protocells creates different properties, and allows them to be programmed to behave differently depending on heat, light, and pressure. The shoes’ unique construction allows them to be 3D printed to the exact size of the user’s foot, so they would fit like a second skin. While running, the shoes would react to pressure and movement, providing extra cushioning when needed.

    "The cells have the capability to inflate and deflate and to respond to pressure," Aden tells Dezeen. “As you’re running on different grounds and textures it’s able to inflate or deflate depending on the pressure you put onto it and could help support you as a runner.”

    After the run, the shoes would be placed in a jar filled with living liquid protocell. The liquid works almost as a recharger or a reviver, keeping the living organisms in the shoes healthy and helping them rejuvenate. The liquid can also be dyed any color, so the shoes would take on the hue of its liquid protocell charger.

    It’s an interesting concept that not only blurs the line between living and non-living organisms, but also pushes the boundaries of 3D printing. According to Aden, the technology is nearly here, and these shoes could become a reality by 2050.

    (via ricesuit)